Friday, 15 February 2013

Rosie Isn't Going to be "Mean Spirited".



Rosie O'Donnell: Memoir Won't Be 'Mean-Spirited’
Rosie O'Donnell has had "an interesting year," she confided Sunday — and a lot of it will be in her new book, "Celebrity Detox," coming this fall.

Speaking at a breakfast gathering at BookExpo America, the publishing industry's annual national convention, O'Donnell said her long-delayed memoir on fame will not be "vindictive" or "mean-spirited," but will offer a candid look at her very public life, including her brief, battling stint on "The View."

"It is, in fact, a drug," she said of fame. She spoke of seeing peers so radically, and scarily, transformed by celebrity that they looked like victims of "crystal meth." Rosie making fun of people's looks. Go figure!

O'Donnell, looking healthy but tired on a Sunday morning, noted that her book was supposed to come out a few years ago, but she decided it wasn't ready, not quite "cooked." Her time on "The View" convinced her she was ready to start baking again. She called the book "half blog," half "straight" writing.

Thursday, 9 August 2012

Mike Gallagher

Mike Gallagher is an American radio host and conservative political commentator. He is the host of The Mike Gallagher Show, a nationally-syndicated radio program that airs throughout the United States on Salem Radio Network and is also a FOX News Channel Contributor and guest host. According to Talkers magazine, Gallagher is the sixth most-listened-to radio talk show host in the United States.

Wednesday, 17 August 2011

Black-necked Grebe


The Black-necked Grebe is 28–34 centimetres (11–13 in) long. The adult is unmistakable in summer with a black head and neck and yellow ear tufts. In winter, this small grebe is white with a poorly defined black cap, which distinguishes it from the crisper-looking Slavonian Grebe (Horned Grebe in America).
In courtship the male gives a mellow poo-ee-chk call to the female.

This species breeds in vegetated areas of freshwater lakes across Europe, Asia, Africa, northern South America and the southwest and western United States. The North American subspecies, P. n. californicus is known as the Eared Grebe (or "eared diver"). These birds migrate in winter, mostly to the Pacific Coast where they range south to El Salvador on a regular basis; vagrants may occur as far as Costa Rica.

Black-necked Grebes of the nominate subspecies P. n. nigricollis in the cooler temperate regions of the Old World also winter further south, with many European birds moving to the Mediterranean area. The isolated southern African race, P. n. gurneyi is sedentary. It was named by South African ornithologist and author Austin Roberts in honour of the English bankers and amateur ornithologists John Henry Gurney and John Henry Gurney Jr..

Sadly the large breeding population in County Roscommon, Ireland discovered about 1915 fell victim to a drainage scheme in the late 1930s; at its peak there were an estimated 250 pairs.